Tag Archives: mobile learning

The 1960’s called, they want their training back!

How are you designing your training these days? Does it look like training did in the 1960’s, 70’s, 80’s? Times have changed, keep up. Get your training up-to-date! It should not only look good, but it should be effective. Train for today’s world, not yesterday’s.

There is no excuse to be using old methodologies, old design and old technology for training. Those of us in the business of Learning and Development strive to help learners learn. But sometimes we might be the impediments to orchestrating learning. The more poorly-designed training and eLearning out there, the worse it looks for our whole industry. The more crap training we put out there, the more people avoid attending training or going through eLearning. Some have started resisting “pushed” learning like the plague. Don’t give training and eLearning a bad rap, redesign your old stuff.

People like Julie Dirksen, Michael Allen, Clark Quinn, and Will Thalheimer started preaching this stuff when they wrote their Serious eLearning Manifesto back in 2014. They worked hard to get people on-board in order to produce more effective training. Kudos to them for bringing this to light. Part of effectiveness of learning is producing training for today and not yesterday.

Just when I see so much good and progress in our industry of learning and development, then I see so many examples of careless design and training thrown together and they call it training. Poor design and totally ineffective. Stop wasting people’s precious time. Come on, let’s all get on-board and turn this around.


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The Time Has Come – eLearning!

A case for changing from e-Learning to eLearning.

Language is such a fluid thing. It’s constantly changing. It never stands still. In France, they have the Académie française that has the official authority on usages, vocabulary and grammar of the French language and to publish official dictionaries. These are basically a group of people who sit down and determine the use of words and how words change over time. We don’t have anything like that here in the United States. But the fact is, we have words that change over time—especially the ones that are used more and more frequently. For example, take email. Originally, it started out as e mail. Then it morphed into e-mail and now it’s changed into a “closed compound” word by eliminating the hyphen and becoming email.

Per The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, there is a “trend toward closed compounds.” They go on to say, “With frequent use, open or hyphenated compounds tend to become closed. …” Another example of this is “on-line” which has become, over time, “online.”

Apple takes this concept to a whole different level with their iAnything! They have their iPad, iPhone, iWatch and maybe tomorrow’s iLunchBox. They don’t hyphenate it. They imply high-tech with the use of a small case “i” in front of their products. We have already taken learning into high-tech and have been doing this for years and years. I’m not implying we should have iLearning; that will be held for Apple to fight for that one, I’m certain. But let’s update this overly-hyphenated word, eLearning, and update it for this millennium.

eLearning has been around long enough. Many have already switched to eLearning, like Lynda.com and eLearning Magazine. Meanwhile, there are those who use both and those who are stuck with the omni-present hyphen. I say it’s high time we move forward to eLearning. Enough time has passed; it’s time to put the hyphen to rest.

The train has left the station, so get on board. Besides, there’s also mLearning to contend with. But that will have to be for another day.



Captivate 8: Responsive or Scalable Software Simulation?

The process for creating software simulations has greatly changed over the past few years. Today most companies need to be creating software simulations that can be viewed on a variety of devices, including mobile. You might as well forget Flash output anymore.

Two exciting outputs for software simulation in Adobe Captivate 8 are Responsive and Scalable simulations for mobile-device learning. These both create an output of HTML5 so you don’t have to worry about them working on mobile devices. This means you can finally forget Flash output!

However, it might be a little confusing at first as to which you should create—a Responsive simulation or a Scalable one.

What’s the difference?

Both Responsive and Scalable simulations can be used on different devices for your mobile training, but the two are different when it comes to what your end-learner sees and in how you start creating them in Captivate 8.

Scalable Simulation

A Scalable simulation shows your entire captured screen on all three types of devices: computer screen (PC or Mac), tablets and smartphones. The screen is kept intact but just gets smaller for tablets and smartphones. A Scalable simulation is a good choice if you always want your entire screen recording to be seen no matter which device is being used to view your tutorial.

For example, below is the same portion of the simulation as it appears in estimated PC/Mac, tablet size and smartphone.

Scalable PC view

Once published, you are able to view the entire screen recording in whatever size device window. Above is an example of viewing it on a PC.

Scalable tablet view

Above is an example of how the same simulation would look on a tablet. Notice that the entire screen is still showing.

Scalable smartphone view

Above is an example of how the same simulation would look on a smartphone. This is when a learner would start squinting.

Note that when creating a Scalable simulation, you cannot scale it in Preview mode. You will need to Publish it first and then drag your window to different sizes to view how it will look in various mobile devices.

Responsive Simulation

A Responsive simulation allows you to show your entire screen recording for PCs/Macs, a smaller portion of the screen for tablets and an even smaller portion of the screen for smartphones. This is a good choice if a scalable simulation choice is too small to see on a smartphone.

In the screen shots below, you’ll see how different portions of the same screen recording are shown in Preview mode in Captivate 8.

Responsive view 1024

Above you see the entire screen in Preview mode for PCs/Macs.

Responsive tablet view

Above you see the portion of the screen in Preview mode for tablets. Notice that a smaller portion of the screen is shown for tablets.

Responsive mobile view

Above you see the small portion of the screen in Preview mode for smartphones. To smartphone users, this almost looks like a zoomed-in shot. But the good thing is, they can see a very clear portion of the screen (no squinting)!

Starting a Responsive or Scalable Simulation Project

As I mentioned above, you must start your Captivate 8 project differently based on if you want it to be a Responsive simulation or a Scalable one. This is something quite different than what we’ve seen in earlier versions of Captivate.

To start a Scalable simulation project, you can either select “Software Simulation” or “Blank Project” from the New tab. To start a Responsive simulation project, you must first select “Responsive Project” from the New tab.

New Project selection box

In either case, after clicking the Create button, you can add your screen recording anywhere in the project by clicking Slides on the menu. It then shows a sub-menu.

Slides menu

Note that “PowerPoint Slide” is unavailable in Responsive projects.

For either Responsive or Scalable simulations, you select “Software Simulation.” Then you would record your simulation just like you have in previous versions of Captivate. After you have recorded your simulation, the workspace is different between Responsive and Scalable projects. Responsive projects display the Primary, Tablet and Smartphone view tabs at the top of the workspace. Scalable simulations do not have this feature. This is why it is important to know which type of simulation you want to use before you start your project.

Responsive workspace

Above is the workspace for a Responsive project. Notice the Primary, Tablet, and Smartphone views.

Scalable workspace
Above is the workspace for a Scalable or regular simulation project.

Generating Scalable Software Simulations

To generate scalable HTML5 for your software simulation, when you click Publish, you need to select the “Scalable HTML content” checkbox.

Scalable Publish options

Working with Responsive Simulations

If you have created a Responsive simulation, Captivate 8 allows you to change which portion of the screen you show by dragging the smartphone or tablet window to the area that you want to show.

Responsive customizable window

Above I’ve moved the Mobile view (Smartphone) window to exactly where I want it.

Having the three views also allows you to change other things on the screen (like objects and text) so that it can be totally different between PCs and smartphones for example.

Summary and Hints

If you understand the output of both Responsive and Scalable simulations, it is easier to start a new project in the right way. This is a change for Adobe Captivate users who have used previous versions. Before, you didn’t have to think about output very much before starting your projects; now you do.

If you want to show the entire portion of your screen recording, no matter which type of device the learner is using, use a Scalable project (Software Simulation or Blank Project).

If you want to show different portions of the screen based on device, use a Responsive project.

From a Responsive project, you can go from a Responsive output to a Scalable output. However, you cannot do the reverse of going from a Software Simulation project to a Responsive project output. If you are in a Responsive project, there is a checkbox in Properties called “Use portion of background Image” that is selected by default for Tablet and Smartphone views. If you deselect that on either the Tablet or Smartphone view, the full screen recording is shown, which makes it like a scalable project.

Use portion checkbox

Above you see the “Use portion of background Image” checkbox is checked by default for the Mobile (Smartphone) view.

I love these outputs that you can find in Adobe Captivate 8. We can now easily create software simulations for mobile devices. The future is now.

 

Adobe Captivate 8 is a product of Adobe Systems, Inc. For more information, see their website at http://www.adobe.com/captivate.

What We Heard: The Four Biggest eLearning Buzzwords of 2013

The year 2014 has commenced, the polar vortex moved in and now some of us are in the grand thaw. Many of us are just getting started with our new eLearning initiatives for the year. But before we proceed, perhaps we should take a few moments to reflect back on 2013.

Happy New Year

Source: Microsoft Office Gallery

Wow, last year we really saw some strides being made, and some bright spots of eLearning picked up some speed. Unless you lived under a rock in 2013, the following terms should sound familiar:

  • MOOCs
  • xAPI
  • Gamification
  • Digital Badges

MOOCs, Massive Open Online Courses, were not new in 2013, but the topic was seen everywhere: eLearning articles, blogs and magazines. It was definitely a “hot” topic this past year. Blackboard’s CourseSites has over 50 MOOC courses available. Coursera, the leading online host of MOOCs, today boasts that 6,009, 077 people have taken MOOCs on its site. They currently offer 563 courses in the MOOC format—amazing! More and more people are creating and taking MOOCs. I got on the MOOC bandwagon last year and took my first MOOC along with over 66,000 other people for the same course. That just makes my jaw drop. Massive education by some of the top professors—again, amazing!

Experience API (xAPI, formerly known as Tin Can API) also popped up in hundreds of articles. The Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) Initiative’s training and learning architecture, xAPI, gained ground this past year with more and more eLearning tools becoming early adopters of xAPI like Adobe Captivate, Articulate Storyline, Blackboard, iSpring, CourseMill, Lectora, LearnDash and dominKnow to name just a few. Experience API, per Wikipedia, is an eLearning “software specification that allows learning content and learning systems to speak to each other in a manner that records and tracks all types of learning experiences.” This even allows us to track informal learning, which we haven’t been able to do before.

Gamification, the use of game thinking, design and mechanics in non-game contexts, has also been around for a few years, but it was plastered all over eLearning newsletters, infographics, blogs and articles last year. We’re seeing an increase of gamification being used to better engage learners and to make them more interested in their eLearning. Companies like NTT Data and DeLoitte’s Leadership Academy are successfully using gamification in their eLearning programs. (See the Forbe’s article http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeannemeister/2013/09/30/gamification-in-leadership-development-how-companies-use-gaming-to-build-their-leader-pipeline/. )

Digital Badges, like Mozilla’s OpenBadges, is an idea that is slowly taking hold; however, the topic was found in a plethora of places in 2013. Digital Badges, per Wikipedia, are “a validated indicator of accomplishment, skill, quality or interest that can be earned in various learning environments.” They’re basically online icons that represent the skills a person has earned. This means that an employer can get a quick glimpse at what you’ve accomplished from not only colleges, but other types of valuable training you’ve taken. The Manufacturing Institute has driven the development of the National Manufacturing Badge System this past year to help fill the gaping hole of manufacturing positions that are going unfilled due to there not being enough qualified or trained people. The system’s purpose is to help match qualified job-seekers with manufacturing employers.

Yes, 2013 was an exciting year for eLearning, and I expect that 2014 will come up with some new, different buzzwords to help move us along to get better trained for the new challenges of 2014.

Read More:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeannemeister/2013/09/30/gamification-in-leadership-development-how-companies-use-gaming-to-build-their-leader-pipeline/

http://www.adlnet.gov/tla/experience-api/

http://openbadges.org/

http://coursera.com

http://coursesites.com