Monthly Archives: October 2014

Ditch the Objectives!

What? Heresy! Oh my, you want me to do what?

In today’s world, we talk about making the learning process engaging for learners; in other words, making it “pop” for students. But, by constantly sharing objectives with learners, aren’t we making the learning process even less appealing? Let’s do more to make them snore!

No sign over ObjectivesIf you Google “learning objectives,” you’ll get page after page of entries on what they are, how to write them and how they relate to Blooms Taxonomy, etc., etc., etc. Objectives are important, but they are important to the instructional designer and how he or she designs and develops courses. Objectives do not need to be presented to learners. Why waste their precious time by burdening them with reading, or more likely, glossing over learning objectives? They will learn what they will learn. Telling them what they are supposed to learn is a total waste of time.

I am not saying that learning objectives are not important. Goals and objectives are the foundations of how eLearning and training should be designed, and they are a must for course design. But that is for the design and development; they do not need to be presented to learners.

How many times have you sat through training and were presented with a PowerPoint slide of objectives? Many start thinking, “OK, get on with the training already!”

Course Objectives Slide

Example of a snore-inducing objectives slide

Then, of course, at the end of the course or lesson, we also tell students what we think they’ve learned.

Course Summary slide

Example of repeating the objectives at the end of a course. Again, sleep-inducing!

I am not free from being guilty of this practice in the past. I think I had to go into therapy to rid myself of this bad habit. And as I recall, I think the 10-step program even included bullet point objectives!

It’s that old, outdated “tell them what you’re going to tell them, tell them and then tell them what you’ve told them.” Stop it! I’ve even seen this carried over to eLearning. Stop this madness! There is no need to spell the objectives out for learners; get to the meat of your content!

Objectives should be used for design and development only; they are very valuable for creating courses and tutorials. They are also imperative if you are measuring the impact of the learning with a quiz, test, or a higher Kirkpatrick level of evaluation. However, don’t keep shoving them down the throats of learners—it’s a sure-fire way to put them to sleep.

(Updated 4/12/2016)

Your discussion on this topic is welcomed!



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